Cindie Kinsh received the Paul Harris award at our March 23rd meeting

 

 
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To contact us please email info@millbrookrotary.org
or call our secretary (845)264-7256
 
 
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Shelter Box at Crisp Architects Home Show
 
Visit Crisp Architects' Home Show and donate to Millbrook Rotary's Shelter Box fund
 
                                 
the link to the Shelter Box web site - https://www.shelterbox.org/
 
the link to the Home Show - http://finehomesource.com/
 
Millbrook Rotary at Millbrook Community Day
 

Millbrook Rotary New Year's Eve 2016 

2017 under construction

 

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2016 Millbrook Rotary Business Directory 

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Club Information

Welcome to our Club!

Millbrook Rotary

Service Above Self

We meet Wednesdays at 12:15 PM
Copperfield's
2571 Route 44
info@millbrookrotary.org
Salt Point, NY  12578
United States
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Home Page Stories
 
Sachem Robert Hawk Storm Birch and Valerie LaRobardier from the Schaghticoke First Nations came to speak about the history and future of the Schaghticoke First Nations (SFN).
 
 
 
Jamie Turndorf (local resident, aka Dr. Love) told us about the subjects discussed in her best-selling book Love Never Dies. It begins with a premonition of her future husband, so powerful that she vows not to date others until she meets him, which she does while attending Vassar. Emile Jean Pin is an ex-Jesuit priest who founded “Liberation Theology.”  After they connected when Jamie was a senior, they were together for 27 years before a tragic bee sting on a beach in Italy caused Mr. Pin, known as “Jean” since leaving the priesthood, to die.  Although Jamie had been raised by atheists and considered herself one as well, she soon started having visitations from Jean, feeling him touch her, seeing him in an animal messenger, and finding that inanimate machines—in this case, fax machines and cellphones—refused to recognize either his death certificate or obituary, or made calls on their own. Ms. Turndorf has concluded that we do not die, but our essence (soul?) is made of dark energy and continues on beyond the physical body. In her book, she tells how to use meditation, breathing, and dialog to become receptive to those who no longer inhabit the body.  The book is scheduled to become both a movie and a television series.
 

 
One of the misunderstandings of The Rotary Foundation is that all of its work is abroad, but there can be global grants for needs in the United States. One local example is a global grant that helps provide $80,000 to improved conditions in a poverty-ridden neighborhood of Yonkers.  This was secured by Bronxville Rotary, which teamed with a Rotary club from Taiwan, which pitched in $10,000 to aid the project. Although it is common to work internationally on grants, two clubs in the U.S. can combine their efforts.  Peekskill and Poughkeepsie-Arlington raised $5,000 for a water project in Haiti, matched by The Rotary Foundation.
Another way that The Rotary Foundation can help is through district grants.  For example, the Pleasantville Rotary was concerned about the plight of senior citizens in their area. They secured a district grant that helped finance survival kits for seniors.
One of the effective projects financed by The Rotary Foundation is support for Rotary Peace Scholars, which brings a number of young people into working for conflict resolution all over the worlds.  Another Foundation program is Global Scholars.
It does not take a lot of money to accomplish good works A recent trip to Starbucks for a Frappuccino, a tea, and a latte ended up costing $14.17, which if it has been contributed to PolioPlus, one of the main projects of The Rotary Foundation, would have provided vaccine for sixteen children, preventing them from experiencing a devastating disease.  You can become a sustaining member (a contribution of $100 per Rotary year) by contributing just $2 a week—easiest to do with Rotary Direct, which will take the donation from a bank account or credit card on a monthly, quarterly, or yearly schedule.
We are nearly finished with the polio-eradication project.  Today’s high-school students barely know what polio is, for it has long been eradicated in the United States.  In addition to Rotary, there has been good financial backing from the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, although they are not so good about crediting Rotary for matching their donations. We think that the next chair of PolioPlus, Mike McGovern, will see the complete eradication of the disease.
In recent years The Rotary Foundation has been producing 60 Peace Scholars a year and last year returned $23.8 million to the districts.
If you are going to be a Rotarian and not just a “lunchatarian,” you should become a regular donor to The Rotary Foundation, since that is the part of Rotary engaged in “doing good in the world.” Using Rotary Direct and just matching what many give to their church would even enroll you in the Paul Harris Society, the folks who donation $1,000 each year to The Rotary Foundation—all it takes is $85 a month, or roughly $20 a week.
Questions:  Dave Brinkerhoff noted that the U.S. (and possibly the world) is experiencing a serious heroin epidemic, with scores dying from overdoses every day.  What is The Rotary Foundation doing to fight that epidemic?  Polio is down to 70 cases a year. Shouldn’t The Rotary Foundation turn to an epidemic that is much more serious today.  Janet: Unfortunately, the Council on Legislation, which would be the ones to make that determination, only meets every three years and has just met.  To get heroin as a major target, we would need to first get our district to endorse the idea, then three years from now they could propose it to the Council on Legislation.  Betty Thurst:  In the meantime, we could do a District Grant to fight addiction in our local area—maybe fund education in the schools.
 

 
 
About 10 years ago, Les Rollins discovered he had heart problems.  Every time he went to the doctor, he said the same thing.  His blood pressure was bad; he was put on medication which caused some dizziness.  After passing out several times, Les went to clinic at Vassar.  He felt with high blood pressure and bad heart, he had to get fixed.  On a nighttime trip to the bathroom, Les slammed into a wall which knocked him down, but he got up and went back to bed.  He was banged up with a black eye and then began to drag his left foot.  A month later, he couldn’t walk at all.  He went to many different doctors; there was no improvement.  Les started to lose the use of his arm – he finally went to the emergency room at Mid-Hudson Regional Hospital where they diagnosed bleeding on the brain which was from the fall a month earlier.  Dr. Cho (neurosurgeon) was in the emergency room at the time.  There was big discussion between Dr. Cho and Les’ cardiologist (who was also in the ER), but Les had no choice.  The cardiologist was afraid Les would die if he had brain surgery, but the neurosurgeon was sure that he would die if he did not have it. He had immediate surgery that night.  He could not be put completely out because of his heart condition.  His head was shaved, scalp cut, and Les passed out.  When he came to, he said, “What the hell are you doing?”  The sound he heard was staples being placed.  The surgery was so much an emergency that Les’ clothes (and even shoes) were not taken off. Les speaks very highly of Dr. Cho and of the physical therapy he received following surgery.  Les had to learn to walk; he couldn’t speak for weeks.  Seventeen days were spent in the hospital. 
 

 
Our own Kathy Gallo gave a lively and informative presentation about Life in Tonga. She shared photos of her grandson’s Ben and Sam, and her daughter and son-in-law. She visited for 3 years in a row and lived on a boat called Independence, which they affectionately called “Inde.” The boat has 4 cabins and 4 bathrooms. There are no motels or hotels. You can’t own land, so no one builds! It takes 17 days to cross the Pacific to reach Tonga. There are 2 seasons – hot and hotter!
 
It’s the 5th most corrupt country in the world and the most obese country in the world.  It’s a very religious country. Everything shuts down every Sunday. The population is 103,000. They have large families. Tonga is known as a Remittance country, which is like tithing.
 
There are numerous pig and chickens roaming the streets. Her grandson was attacked by a pig and needed 13 stitches. The hospitals lack cleanliness. Pig roasts are often the main feast. Kathy spent a lot of time in the library, and stumbled upon a book about health written in 1937. Whales have their babies in Tonga.
 

 
Speaker:
Dr. Alison Nohara is a brain surgeon who is the head of neurointerventional surgery at Vassar Hospital. Dr. Nohara came to the Hudson Valley because she learned that there was not special unit for treating strokes anywhere nearby, Her new facility at Vassar Hospital opened last year. Her group handles treatment of brain, spine, carotid arteries, nosebleeds, and—the subject of her talk—strokes.
 
 
David Brinkerhoff's History of the Millbrook Rotary
David is a charter member of the Millbrook Rotary.  Dave joined Rotary when it was an all male organization.  The first female president was Mary Lou Murphy.  Dave was the 4th president of the Millbrook Rotary Club.
 
 
 
Speakers
Cathy Lan & Camille Marcotte from Cornell Cooperative Extension on
Recycling and Composting
 
Dutchess County has single stream recycling. Which means that you do not have to separate your recycling items.  In Dutchess County everyone is required to recycle, it's the law. In Dutchess County our recycling is brought to the Materials Recovery Facility in Beacon.
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Installatio Picnic
 
April, 5th Wheel Gathering
 
Identity Fraud
     click here to download the talk slideshow 
 
click here to download the pdf version
 
 
 

Millbrook Rotary New Year's Eve 2016 

2017 under construction

 

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Rotary recognized on public television's 'American Graduate Day'
Rotary was recognized on 17 September on public television's fifth annual American Graduate Day program for its work with San Diego-based Monarch School, a K-12 school for homeless youth. The Rotary Club of San Diego, California, USA, was applauded for its work mentoring Monarch's students, keeping them on track to graduate, and helping the school to continue thriving during tough economic times. Monarch School CEO Erin Spiewak appeared as one of the show's guests, along with Monarch Alumnus Cynthia Valenzuela, who attested to the positive, life-changing experience Monarch School gave her and...
Practicing peace
Nations around the world will observe the International Day of Peace on 21 September, a date designated by the United Nations in 2001 as "a day of global ceasefire and nonviolence." Rotary's commitment to building peace and resolving conflict is rooted in the Rotary Peace Centers program, formed in 2002. Each year, the program prepares up to 100 fellows to work for peace through a two-year master's degree program or a three-month professional certificate program at university partners worldwide. Today, nearly 1,000 peace centers alumni are applying their skills — negotiating peace in conflict...
Charity Navigator upgrades Rotary Foundation’s rating
The Rotary Foundation has received the highest possible score from Charity Navigator, an independent evaluator of charities in the U.S. In the most recent ratings, released on 1 September, The Rotary Foundation earned the maximum 100 points for both financial health and accountability and transparency. The ratings reflect how efficiently Charity Navigator believes the Foundation will use donations, how well it has sustained programs and services, and its level of commitment to good governance and openness. In the previous rating, the Foundation had received 97 points.
eBay Live Auctions that benefit Rotary
Each month, eBay, the world’s largest auction website, selects a set of upcoming Live Auction events and donates a portion of all sales proceeds to Rotary. Only U.S. auction sales are eligible. See the schedule of September auctions.
Rotary district collecting relief funds for Louisiana flood victims
Rotary clubs of District 6200 are collecting relief funds to help thousands of victims after record flooding devastated communities in southern Louisiana, USA, earlier this month. Torrential rains caused rivers, streams, and bayous to swell, damaging or destroying more than 60,000 homes and killing at least 13 people. The U.S. Coast Guard and emergency responders helped rescue more than 30,000 residents from the rising flood waters. As of 25 August, more than 3,000 residents were still in emergency shelters even after the water receded. Donate to District 6200 disaster relief fund.
 

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